Revolutionary Therapeutic Dental Adhesives Show Aptitude to Remineralize Resin-Dentin Bonding Interface through Biomimetic Processes

Posted on May 26, 2015

Clinical minimally invasive treatments require the elimination of dental caries-infected tissues in order to stop the progression of bacteria to the pulpal chamber and maximize the reparative potential of the remaining partially demineralized tissues.

In order to encourage the remineralization of the remaining partially demineralized dental tissues after caries removal, glass-ionomer cements are currently used to favor the diffusion of the specific ions into mineral-depleted dentin. Nevertheless, these cements have no therapeutic ability to bio-remineralize the partially demineralized caries-affected dentine, accurately. It means that glass-ionomer cements, along with most of the restorative materials currently used in minimally invasive dentistry, do not induce nucleation of new hydroxyapatite crystals within the demineralized dentine collagen at intra-fibrillar level.

Salvatore Sauro, Professor of Dental Biomaterials and Minimally Invasive Dentistry at CEU Cardenal Herrera University, has led a research project which focused first on the use of phosphoproteins' biomimetic analogues in combination with experimental bioactive resin-based dental adhesives to remineralize the mineral-depleted dentin at the bonding interface of teeth filled with common restorative dental composites. The biomimetic analogues used in this study permitted the remineralization of collagen fibrils through precipitation of hydroxyapatite at intra-fibrillar level, so that the biomechanical properties of the demineralized dentin, such as the elastic modulus and hardness, were completely recovered. The results of this recent study have been published in Dental Materials.

According to professor Sauro, "The most important problem related to dental fillings in demineralized dental tissues, such as caries-affected dentine, is the lack of therapeutic bio-remineralization which can extend the durability of the resin-dentine bonding interface created with dental adhesives and resin composites."

Biomimetic Remineralization

Professor Sauro and collaborators have also shown that by using analogues of phosphoproteins in combination with bioactive adhesive resin-based materials doped with calcium and phosphates, it is possible to improve the longevity of the adhesion of dental composite restorations to dental tissues due to the biomimetic remineralization of mineral-depleted dentine at the bonding interface.

According to Salvatore Sauro, this study has demonstrated that the use of resin- adhesive doped with bioactive micro-fillers applied onto demineralized dentine pre-treated using biomimetic analogues of the phosphoproteins, such as polyaspartic acid (PLA) or sodium trimetaphosphate (TMP) represents an efficient and innovative therapeutic strategy to trigger biomimetic remineralization processes at the bonding area between dentine and restorative materials. This result is a further step to the prolific research activity of Professor Sauro, who is currently focusing the energy of his entire group of research on the development of innovative bioactive and biomimetic restorative materials for therapeutic and aesthetic restorations of teeth affected by large caries lesions.

Source: Science Daily

Panthera Holds US Grand Opening

Posted on May 22, 2015

Panthera Dental announced the launch of 4 new products at the grand-opening celebration for its new US office in East Rutherford, New Jersey, the Canadian company’s first American location. The event was at Vizstara Professional’s facility in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, with both dentists and technicians in attendance.

“Today, everything will change,” said Panthera President and Cofounder Gabriel Robichaud. Panthera is hiring salespeople across the country as part of a US push.

At the grand opening event, T&S Laboratory CEO Sonnie Bocala and Michael Gelb, DDS, MS, made presentations about the Panthera Anti-Snoring Device.  Gelb called the device “transformative.”

Then, Cofounder Bernard Robichaud introduced the new products:

·      A chip in the anti-snoring device that will track usage, allowing employers to prove to insurance providers that employees are being treated for sleep apnea.

·      A new pink version of the popular REBourke bar called the REBourke Pink, with $100 of the proceeds from each bar donated to breast cancer-awareness organizations. 

·      Milled PEEK bars that are flexible, wear resistant, and 3 times lighter than titanium.

·      A new implant bar attachment called the Dolder ++.

For more information, visit pantheradental.com. 

Healthy Smiles, Healthy Children Commits More Than $1.1 Million In Grants to Underserved Children

Posted on May 22, 2015

CHICAGOMay 22, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Healthy Smiles, Healthy Children (HSHC), the Foundation of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD), announced today from its AAPD 2015 meeting in Seattle that it will partner with 22 organizations this year and provide an unprecedented $1.1 million grant dollars for underserved children to have a Dental Home. Since 2010, HSHC has donated more than $3 million in support of access to care initiatives helping more than 290,000 children in 26 states.

"We are pleased to award another $1 million-plus in new HSHC grants this year," said HSHC President Dr. Beverly Largent. "These deserving organizations are doing great things for kids in their communities and HSHC is proud to support them."

Congratulations to the HSHC's 2015 Grantees listed below:

  • Eastman Institute for Oral Health University of RochesterRochester, N.Y. 

  • Community Health Centers of BurlingtonBurlington, Vt.

  • The Floating Hospital: Long Island, N.Y. 

  • SmileHealthy: Champaign, Ill.

  • The Dental Foundation of OregonWilsonville, Ore.

  • Children's Hospital Colorado: Aurora, Colo.

  • First Choice Health Centers, Inc.: East Hartford, Conn.

  • Kids Smiles: Philadelphia, Pa.

  • Cincinnati Health Department: Cincinnati, Ohio.

  • Petaluma Health Center: Petaluma, Calif.

  • Children's Dental Services: Minneapolis, Minn.

  • KidSMILES Pediatric Dental Clinic: Dublin, Ohio.

  • Yale New Haven Hospital Department of Pediatric Dentistry: New Haven, Conn.

  • Hennepin Health Foundation: Minneapolis, Minn.

  • Caridad Center, Inc.: Boynton Beach, Fla.

  • Family Healthcare: Fargo, N.D.

  • CASS Community Health Foundation: Kansas City, Mo.

  • Charles Henderson Child Health Center: Troy, Ala.

  • St. Vincent Healthcare Foundation: Billings, Mont.

  • Neighborcare Health: Seattle, Wash.

  • University of Washington: The Center for Pediatric Dentistry: Seattle, Wash.

    *HSHC Dental Home Day Site

In addition, HSHC has identified two outstanding organizations to be awarded Multi-Year HSHC Grants of $375,000 over five years:

  • Kids' Community Dental Clinic: Burbank, Calif.

  • Waukesha County Community Dental Clinic: Waukesha, Wis.

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Dental Researchers Find Some Immune Cells Change to Prolong Inflammation

Posted on May 22, 2015

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine have unraveled one of the mysteries of how a small group of immune cells work, according to Science Daily: That some inflammation-fighting immune cells may actually convert into cells that trigger disease.

Their findings, recently reported in the journal Pathogens, could lead to advances in fighting diseases, said the project's lead researcher Pushpa Pandiyan, an assistant professor at the dental school.

To read the full Science Daily article, click here.

Aurum Group Awards Free Summitt Trip

Posted on May 21, 2015

Spokane, WA – The management and staff at the Aurum Group announced that Dr. Brent Davis of Cranbrook, British Columnbia, has won the grand prize in the “Trip to the Summit” Draw at the recent Pacific Dental Conference Meeting in Vancouver.

Davis received a package of registration fees and accommodations for two at The Dental Technology and Business Growth Summit 2015, which will be held October 1-3 at The Banff Centre in Banff, Alberta.

The summitt will feature Chris Hadfield (Astronaut and First Canadian Commander of the International Space Station) and Arlene Dickinson (CEO of Venture Communications and YOUINC.COM and "Dragon" on TV’s Dragons’ Den) as keynote speakers. They will be joined by a diverse group of opinion leaders on applied dental technology and the art and discipline of entrepreneurism.

Pew Study Shows Little Progress on Proven Oral Health Strategy

Posted on May 20, 2015

WASHINGTON — States are driving up health care costs for families and taxpayers by not doing enough to use dental sealants, according to States Stalled on Dental Sealant Programs, a new report by The Pew Charitable Trusts. The report, reveals that most states are failing to enact policies that ensure low-income children receive dental sealants—clear plastic coatings applied to the chewing surfaces of molars that are a proven strategy for preventing tooth decay. Applying a sealant is one-third of the cost of filling a cavity. 

The report grades all 50 states and the District of Columbia on their efforts to prevent decay by improving access to sealants for low-income children, and updates Pew’s 2013 research on sealant programs. In the years since the 2013 report, only 12 states improved their grades, while seven states lost ground; most fail to reach even half of eight-year-olds with this preventive service. The majority of states continue to lack sealant programs in most of their “high-need” schools, which most states define as where at least half of the students participate in the National School Lunch Program.

Pew’s report finds that:

  • Only five states earned an A or A- for their sealant performance, of which just three (Maine, New Hampshire, and Oregon) received the maximum possible points. 

  • Nine states earned a B or B-. Of these states, five continue to reach fewer than half of high-need schools with their sealant programs, and four failed to provide at least half of their 8-year-olds with sealants. 

  • Nineteen states received a C or C-. 

  • Fifteen states earned a D or D-. 

  • Three states (New Jersey, Hawaii and Wyoming) and the District of Columbia earned F’s, the same grade they received in 2013.

Sealants are typically first applied to children’s molars shortly after permanent teeth begin to appear, usually by age eight. Molars are the most cavity-prone teeth, and sealants act as a barrier against decay-causing bacteria. Research shows that providing sealants through school-based programs is a cost-effective way to reach low-income children, who are at greater risk for cavities. Pew’s report offers profiles of the progress and challenges in two states—Ohio and Washington—that sought to eliminate the racial and income disparities among children receiving sealants in school-based programs..

School sealant programs have been found to reduce the incidence of tooth decay by an average of 60 percent, yet Pew’s report reveals that most states are underperforming on this critical opportunity to improve children’s health. Left untreated, dental disease can lead to emergency room visits, hospitalization, and even death. Despite the compelling evidence on cost efficiency and prevention effectiveness, a survey conducted between 2011 and 2012 found that only four out of ten U.S. children aged six to 19 had even one sealant.

"It's a cost-effective, evidence-based prevention program that every state should make a priority," said Jane Koppelman, research director for children’s dental policy at the Pew Charitable Trusts. "But unfortunately, they are not doing so. The results, in addition to higher health care costs, are needless pain and infection among children who do not receive care."

This report focuses solely on the performance of sealant programs and the degree to which states can improve access to this treatment for at-risk children. However, many other factors affect a state’s overall performance on oral health, such as health insurance coverage, the availability of Medicaid providers, and access to fluoridated water. Therefore, even states that received high grades on sealants may have room for improvement in other areas. 

Register for ADHA's Annual Session in Nashville

Posted on May 20, 2015

In exactly four weeks, the American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) will kickoff its Center for Lifelong Learning at the 92nd Annual Session (CLL/AS) in Nashville, Tenn. (#ADHANashville)! More than 2,000 dental hygiene professionals will enjoy a wide array of exciting events, networking opportunities, continuing education courses and fun in the Music City June 17-23, 2015!

At the 2015 Exhibits, there will be more than 100 companies in attendance, giving dental hygienists the chance to stock up on items for their dental office or oral health program while supporting the ADHA. The exhibit hall will be open on Friday, June 19, from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. and Saturday, June 20, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. The first 200 attendees to enter the exhibit floor on Friday morning will receive a free gift! In addition, all exhibit hall attendees can receive a free lunch courtesy of the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program by picking up a $15 food voucher each day from the Wrigley Booth (number 410) to be used in the Exhibit Hall Restaurant. New for this year’s event is the ADHA/Henry Schein Innovation Center, which features new equipment, products and technologies!

Don’t forget to register in advance for ADHA’s Institute for Oral Health (IOH) online Silent Auction, where interested participants can bid online for the items available at the IOH Benefit/President’s Reception on Friday, June 19. Register today and support the ADHA’s foundation!

Have you registered for 2015 CLL/AS? 

Medical Internships Abroad Gaining Popularity Among Students

Posted on May 20, 2015

NEW YORK – May 20, 2015 – As students across North America prepare for a busy summer, Projects Abroad is pleased to report that internship programs in the field of Medicine & Healthcare are becoming increasingly popular, especially among pre-med and high school students. This year, hundreds of students are choosing to spend their summer break abroad as interns, working toward adding valuable experience to their resumes and broadening their clinical, procedural, and cultural skills.

For pre-med and high school students, the experience of interning in medical facilities abroad is invaluable and helps gives them the confidence to pursue a career in medicine. Not only do they have the opportunity to learn new methods of diagnosis and treatment from local medical professionals, they get to observe illnesses and conditions not seen in North America. They also experience an environment where doctors and nurses work with limited resources and equipment.

"All in all, I had many life changing experiences in the hospital and expanded upon my current medical knowledge, learning things that I can bring back to America and help me tremendously. To be able to have had these experiences before I even graduate college is amazing and I am certain that I want to pursue a career in medicine," shares Jenna C, a pre-med student and former intern at a hospital in the Philippines.

Rebecca K, a high school senior who volunteered on a summer program in Argentina, says "I learned more about medicine in the two weeks I lived in Cordoba than I could have ever imagined. I saw many surgeries including brain surgery, tumor removal, and even part of a long open heart surgery. The surgeons almost always offered to explain what they were doing and encouraged all of the students to have a closer look. It was amazing to be so close to such intricate procedures."

The organization offers a variety of Medicine & Healthcare programs for interns in the fields of Medicine, Nursing, Dentistry, Midwifery, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Nutrition, and Public Health, in more than 25 destinations across the developing world. These internships are built to suit varying levels of experience and interns can choose to join at any time, from one to four weeks or more. Projects Abroad also has an extensive range of worthwhile medical programs specifically designed for high school students.

For more information about Medicine & Healthcare internships with Projects Abroad, please visit www.projects-abroad.org/volunteer-projects/medicine-and-healthcare. For information about medical programs for high school students, visit www.projects-abroad.org/volunteer-projects/high-school-specials/medicine-and-healthcare.

IADS Annual Congress Coming in September

Posted on May 20, 2015

The International Association of Dental Students (IADS), FDI World Dental Federation, and Young Dentists Worldwide are organizing the IADS Annual Congress in Bangkok, Thailand this September. Students from around the world will meet with dentists, creating new bonds and experiences.

The Pre-Congress will take place September 19-20. The Congress will be September 22-26, and the Post-Congress will be September 26-28.

The event will feature various clinical/research activities, a worldwide dental student parliament, FDI speaker sessions, and exhibitions.

Registration will open soon. For more information and updates, visit www.iadsthailand.wix.com/iads2.

AAE Announces New Leaders, Award Winners at AAE15

Posted on May 20, 2015

CHICAGO – Thousands of endodontists and other dental professionals explored the future of endodontics at AAE15, the annual meeting of the American Association of Endodontists, in Seattle, Wash., in early May. The meeting included the installation of new leadership for the Boards of the AAE, AAE Foundation and American Board of Endodontics, more than 100 education sessions, the nation's largest endodontic exhibit hall and several special events, including the Association's annual awards ceremony.

Keynote speaker Dr. Michio Kaku, renowned futurist and best-selling author of The Future of the Mind, gripped attendees at the General Session, where he shared his vision of new technologies that will impact society in the future. While Dr. Kaku predicts "robo-doctors" that will diagnose you in your home, he also acknowledged, "[To succeed in the future] you have to supply something which robots cannot – intellectual capital."

Following that theme, outgoing AAE President Robert S. Roda told attendees, "If we're going to shape the future, we need an organization that can study, that can learn and that can act." Dr. Roda recapped the accomplishments of the Association during his term, including the hiring of new Executive Director Peter S. Weber and environmental scanning and quality improvement projects that are helping the AAE prepare for the future of the specialty.

In her first remarks as AAE President, Dr. Terryl A. Propper said she hopes to increase engagement and involvement in the Association by the next generation of endodontists. "I want to inspire a process that will yield effective change for our members and our specialty."

The AAE Foundation closed out its year-long fundraising campaign with $1.221 million raised against a goal of $1.25 million. A leadership pledge of $350,000 from EdgeEndo helped to complete another successful effort. The Foundation has allocated $1.6 million in 2015 to support research and education in endodontics, including awards for each endodontic resident, educator fellowship awards, endowed faculty matching grants and support for a variety of research priorities.

During AAE15, 81 new Diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics were recognized for their achievements. These Board-certified endodontists complete written, case history and oral exams demonstrating their exceptional knowledge, skill and expertise in the specialty of endodontics, commitment to quality patient care and dedication to professional growth.

The AAE also unveiled new resources during the meeting to support endodontists in their careers and to educate patients. The new Career Center is an online job board that allows visitors to post available endodontic positions, easily search and apply for jobs and connect to practices for sale. New Career Resources also are available to help with career planning, including understanding emerging practice models, negotiating employment contracts, job search tips and starting a practice. Currently, more than 130 positions are posted.

The AAE also debuted the fourth production in its series of 3-D animated patient education videos. The new video on endodontic surgery illustrates the most common form of surgery, apicoectomy, in an easy-to-understand animated video. It highlights the advanced training and equipment used by endodontists to perform endodontic surgery to save the natural dentition. All of the AAE's videos are available on its YouTube channel for viewing or embedding into practice websites. 

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