February 2017
Volume 8, Issue 2

Chronology of U.S. Department of Labor Job Zone Classification Of Dental Laboratory Technicians

2010 – U.S. Department of Labor implements the 2010 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) System. All occupations classified within 5 “Job Zones”. “Skilled” and “Unskilled” categories no longer used. The occupation of Dental Laboratory Technician (NAICS Code 51-9081) is placed in Job Zone 2.

May 2011 – NADL partners with ADA and a coalition of allied dental associations and corresponds with DOL proposing changes to the occupation classification for Dental Laboratory Technicians. NADL was told that the SOC would not be revised until 2018. NADL works with congressional contacts and later told a re-survey of the occupation will be performed in 2013-2014.

June 2013 – NADL partners with ADA and along with a coalition of eleven organized dental associations as signatories sends a letter to Department of Labor on this issue, explaining the negative impacts of categorizing DLTs in Job Zone Two and requesting that DLTs be classified in a higher Job Zone that more accurately describes the profession.

Fall 2013 - Summer 2014 – U.S. Department of Labor conducts an occupational survey to re-survey the incumbent employees in dental laboratory technician occupation.

February 2014 – NADL works directly with the staff at the U.S. Department of Labor and points out a flaw in the survey questions related to education levels.

April 2014 – In response to NADL’S February communication, U.S. Department of Labor’s O*NET OnLine education categories are updated to show post-secondary certificates which 27 percent of Dental Laboratory Technicians hold according to the 2010 O*NET survey data.

July 2014 – NADL drafts and submits a Formal Comment to the Office of Management and Budget in response to OMB’s May, 2014 Notice Of Solicitation Of Comments For The 2018 SOC Revision. NADL’s comment recommended moving Dental Laboratory Technician to a different major occupational group, adjustments to survey methodology and the consideration of data provided by trade associations and other sources.

October 2014 – The results of the re-survey are posted on the O*Net Production Database site and appear on the *ONet OnLine site. Dental Laboratory Technician remain classified in Job Zone 2.

O*NET Job Zones

Overview

A Job Zone is a group of occupations that are similar in:

• how much education people need to do the work,
• how much related experience people need to do the work, and
• how much on-the-job training people need to do the work.

The five Job Zones are:

Job Zone 1 - occupations that need little or no preparation
Job Zone 2 - occupations that need some preparation
Job Zone 3 - occupations that need medium preparation
Job Zone 4 - occupations that need considerable preparation
Job Zone 5 - occupations that need extensive preparation

Job Zone One: Little or No Preparation Needed

Education

Some of these occupations may require a high school diploma or GED certificate.
 

Related Experience

Little or no previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, a person can become a waiter or waitress even if he/she has never worked before.

Job Training

Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few days to a few months of training. Usually, an experienced worker could show you how to do the job.

Job Zone Examples

These occupations involve following instructions and helping others. Examples include taxi drivers, amusement and recreation attendants, counter and rental clerks, construction laborers, continuous mining machine operators, and waiters/waitresses.

SVP Range

(Below 4.0)

Job Zone Two: Some Preparation Needed

Education

These occupations usually require a high school diploma.
 

Related Experience

Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public.

Job Training

Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

Job Zone Examples

These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include sheet metal workers, forest fire fighters, customer service representatives, physical therapist aides, salespersons (retail), and tellers.

SVP Range

(4.0 to < 6.0)

Job Zone Three: Medium Preparation Needed

Education

Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate's degree.
 

Related Experience

Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job.

Job Training

Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations.

Job Zone Examples

These occupations usually involve using communication and organizational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include food service managers, electricians, agricultural technicians, legal secretaries, interviewers, and insurance sales agents.

SVP Range

(6.0 to < 7.0)

Job Zone Four: Considerable Preparation Needed

Education

Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor's degree, but some do not.
 

Related Experience

A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified.

Job Training

Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training.

Job Zone Examples

Many of these occupations involve coordinating, supervising, managing, or training others. Examples include accountants, sales managers, database administrators, teachers, chemists, environmental engineers, criminal investigators, and special agents.

SVP Range

(7.0 to < 8.0)

Job Zone Five: Extensive Preparation Needed

Education

Most of these occupations require graduate school. For example, they may require a master's degree, and some require a Ph.D., M.D., or J.D. (law degree).

 

Related Experience

Extensive skill, knowledge, and experience are needed for these occupations. Many require more than five years of experience. For example, surgeons must complete four years of college and an additional five to seven years of specialized medical training to be able to do their job.

Job Training

Employees may need some on-the-job training, but most of these occupations assume that the person will already have the required skills, knowledge, work-related experience, and/or training.

Job Zone Examples

These occupations often involve coordinating, training, supervising, or managing the activities of others to accomplish goals. Very advanced communication and organizational skills are required. Examples include librarians, lawyers, aerospace engineers, wildlife biologists, school psychologists, surgeons, treasurers, and controllers.

SVP Range

(8.0 and above)

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