February 2017
Volume 38, Issue 2

The Complexity of Care & Loss

Has dentistry grown more difficult to practice? We are, after all, sifting through multifaceted treatments, emerging opioid and antibiotic concerns, and expanded definitions of patient care. On the other hand, perhaps we have simply become more aware of dentistry’s nuances due to additional channels for knowledge dissemination, the growing body of scientific evidence, and our tenacious desire to be the best clinicians we can be. This array of complexity is largely a result of the proliferation of information and our access to it.

Case in point, authors James Bahcall, DMD, MS, and Qian Xie, DDS, PhD, point out in their continuing education article how we, as clinicians, may need to our readjust perspectives regarding the use of local anesthesia agents. As these experts note, it is one of the most important drugs given to patients. Yet, we overlook their significance and, in doing so, struggle to “consistently achieve profound pulpal anesthesia.” Dr. Bahcall, one of our new Editorial Advisory Members, and Dr. Xie provide a thorough education on how these drugs work and how to objectively test for signs of pulpal anesthesia.

I also want to note with sadness the passing of one of our great dental innovators and legends, Dr. Carl E. Misch, who died January 4. An important friend to dentistry and to myself, Dr. Misch obtained 16 patents, was a recognized international expert on implant dentistry, and was the co-inventor of the BioHorizons Maestro Implant System. He believed passionately in the value of education, establishing the Misch International Implant Institute in 1984, which has trained more than 4500 dentists.

Dr. Misch was also a clinical professor and director of oral implantology in the Department of Periodontology at Maurice H. Kornberg School of Dentistry at Temple University in Philadelphia, in addition to other academic appointments. He operated a private practice for 30 years devoted to bone grafting, implant placement, implant complications, and prosthodontics.

I was honored to serve on several committees with Dr. Misch and found him to be a consummate professional and gentleman, always willing to share his thoughts and knowledge with those around him. His textbook, Contemporary Implant Dentistry, is a resource that I go to often for multidisciplinary approaches to implant care. Dr. Misch was an individual with tremendous energy who had a unique insight into the science of implant dentistry. The world has lost an incredible human being, and dentistry has lost a great champion.

Thank you for your support of our journal throughout the years. With Compendium of Continuing Education in Dentistry entering its 38th year of publication, we have begun an Instagram account. Follow us at Compendium_CED to stay abreast of the latest trends in dentistry. As always, I welcome your comments and feedback.

Sincerely,

Louis F. Rose, DDS, MD

Editor-In-Chief

lrose@aegiscomm.com

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